Several months ago I had been running a Minecraft server for my son and I to play on. He thought it was wonderful. However, the machine got rebuilt and the server was unavailable for a while. That was until last night.

Couple weeks back I found a program called YAMS, which per the subject of this post means Yet another Minecraft Server. I liked how you could run multiple servers, and some other key features. So I decided to install it, since I could run it on a Windows computer, rather than use Linux like I had been previously. I love Linux, and it runs fine, but I just wanted to use Windows so I could take advantage of the hardware to perform other things.

I finally got it installed and configured last night. Now all we need to do is to test it. I also download Bukkit and setup a server using it. So we can now run a couple of servers and just use a web based GUI to configure it. Now the what plugins to download and install. Guess we have some playing to do.

If you need to download the Bukkit library, it was taken down due to legal issues. But a mirror exists and I found the following mirror here (Yive’s Mirror).

Below is a picture of the YAMS Control dialog;

YAMS-Control

Quick demo in Simpana 10 using Bootstrapper to download some Unix Packages and use these to populate the Commserve Software Cache. Basically you would use this in situations where you would like to manual maintain what gets loaded into the cache and under what conditions that happens, in addition, you might have a Commserve that has no internet access, so you would need to do this so you can subsequently push out packages to other clients.

If you find some value from the video, please post a comment. Please note this video is only available in 720p, however future ones will be higher resolution. I was using some new software so still coming to terms with how record with it.

Thanks

Update: Now updated with a higher resolution video version. Now you will be able to play it in 1080p and see everything I can see.

Yesterday and today I made some final changes to Heimic sites. I had some months ago created a subdomain which saw the blog move to that location. i.e. blog.heimic.net. However as of the past few days I decided to revert this back.

The site blog.heimic.net is redirecting back to top level domain (TLD) heimic.net. All content has been moved too. The TLD will continue to be the primary place for everything I do. I do not plan on changing this again. It should remain for a very long time.

I know these changes will have had some impact of site ranking on Google and indexing, however, I imagine this will eventually update.

My posts about Commvault Simpana and demo/walk throughs will be posted here too. They will not be on subdomain http://on.heimic.net/groundzero/ moving forward.

If you like something I post, please comment. If no one reads this stuff, nor comments, than motivation to post any content goes to zero.

 

As noted in yesterday’s blog post here, our Mikrotik RouterBoard RB951G-2HnD arrived and I have managed to take a few pictures.

You’ll note I have taken photos of the unit with the recently purchased Mikrotik RouterBoard RB260GS switch. As you can see the enclosure for these units is exactly the same.

If you want to check out the product specifications you can do so by clicking the model name on this post or refer to the table below;

Product specifications

Details
Product code RB951G-2HnD
CPU nominal frequency 600 MHz
CPU core count 1
Size of RAM 128 MB
10/100 Ethernet ports 0
10/100/1000 Ethernet ports 5
MiniPCI slots 0
MiniPCI-e slots 0
Wireless chip model AR9344-DC3A
Wireless standards 802.11b/g/n
Number of USB ports 1
Power Jack 1
802.3af support No
Supported input voltage 9 V – 30 V
PoE out No
PoE in Yes
Voltage Monitor No
CPU temperature monitor No
PCB temperature monitor No
Dimensions 113x138x29mm
Operating System RouterOS
Operating temperature range -20C .. +50C
License level 4
Antenna gain DBI 2.5
Current Monitor No
CPU AR9344-DC3A
Max Power consumption Up to 7W
SFP ports 0
SFP+ ports 0
USB slot type USB type A
Number of chains 2
Serial port None

I still need to spend the time to plug it in and configure it, which won’t be too difficult, as I will take the configuration off hAP Lite I am using currently. Will post up another post in a couple weeks on how I progressed with the configuration of the unit and what not.

 

My experience with Mikrotik RouterBoard line of products is relatively new (as in got my first unit ever back in mid April). Anyways enough background, let’s get straight into it.

I purchased the following two units as I was wishing to evaluate them, while I have plans to use the Mikrotik RouterBoard RB260GS switch in my new house when its finished being built. I heard the best place to purchase this gear is from Duxtel (as mentioned by a friend who is crazy mad about Mikrotik hardware). So I ordered them and they arrived 11 days ago and I immediately set up the hAP Lite (RB941-2n) as my Home Internet Router with an ADSL modem in bridged mode. It’s been running as this since that time.

The hAP Lite (RB941-2n) is an awesome device, it has completely impressed me. So much so it has handled everything I use my Home Internet for and still keeps on running. I’ll post a few graphs from the routers monitoring graphs, which shows CPU usage and other metrics towards the end of this post.

I personally love the winbox interface, however, if you like you can use the webfig (web) method to configure it or you can use pure terminal. I actually use a combination of terminal and winbox to configure mine.

I’ve noticed when you do a export of the configuration from terminal prompt, this will use 100% CPU, however upon export being completed CPU usage returns back to what it was. While this happens, I haven’t noticed any hiccup in my connection. But I guess I am not stressing link at the time to notice it.

The Mikrotik RouterBoard RB260GS is a nice little smart switch. Web interface is quite clean. I had mine configured to split out a VLAN trunk that was being passed to it from my Mikrotik RouterBoard RB450G within an hour (since I am pretty new to this gear). My plan is to use this and some other hardware to allow me to VLAN trunk down to a few key rooms (will post more about this in the next 12-18months). I’ve ordered anĀ RB951G-2HnD which is the exact same case size/design to be my Router, so that I have nice matching units to mount in the future Hills Home Hub at the new house.

Highly recommend this hardware, I love how you can take ports out of the switch and turn them into routing ports etc.

Pictures:

The hAP Lite (RB941-2n) monitoring graphs, as generated every 5mins by the router itself.

Recently bought a Lego Train for one of the kids, and I must say after putting it all together. I think it is probably one of the best Lego models ever. Kids seem to think so too.

I thought I should do a quick post about Mikrotik RouterBoard Hairpin NAT and Port Forwarding. The post in which I used to set this up on my router is found here.

The best explanation for this, would be that if you want to have say http from the public interface forwarded to an internal host, while not impacting LAN access to the RouterBoard’s http port. The forum post linked is how to best handle this situation.

It also allows your internal LAN clients to access your public IP and forward to the appropriate host/service internally too.